American Eagle Realty | Derry Real Estate, Londonderry Real Estate, Salem Real Estate


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Whether you’re buying or selling a home, you might discover there is an easement attached to your property. If so, you’re probably wondering how this affects your property values.

What is an Easement?

In a nutshell, an easement is for one person to have explicit permission to have use of another person’s property for a specified purpose. There are three general types of easements: gross, appurtenant and prescriptive. Each has specific rights attached to them and the rights could be for either a private (i.e. allowing someone access or use) or public purpose (i.e. utility companies). Easements can be temporary or permanent; with the latter, the easement is typically written into the property deed.

It’s important to know, while easements permit others to use your land for a designated reason, it doesn’t grant anyone using your land any rights to ownership; you are sole owner.

Can Easements Affect Property Values?

Easements of land may or may not impact your property’s value, depending on how the land is being used and whether you want to use (or sell) your property. Many times, an easement has no impact on your property’s value. However, there are potential issues that may crop up when looking to develop or sell your land which could impact its perceived value.

  • Easements might limit the ability to build structures on affected portions of the land.
  • Resale values might be impacted by structures, wires, pipes, etc. placed by utility companies, especially if they are unsightly or prevent owners from developing the land for personal purposes.
  • Buyers might not like the idea of others “trespassing” on their land, even if being done legally.
  • On the other hand, some easement holders pay a fee to the property owner, and collecting this money might be an attractive prospect to some buyers.
  • In many neighborhoods, everyone has the same easement attached to their property. In these cases, it doesn’t typically impact your property value because the easements affect everyone’s property equally.

    Is There a Way to Remove an Easement?

    A court of law often considers an easement to be used in perpetuity unless a stipulation exists in the original agreement of how long the easement will last. In some cases, easements can be removed.

  • A written agreement is made with the easement holder to terminate the easement (easier if the original purpose of using the land is abandoned or no longer valid).
  • If easements are no longer used or needed, inquire if a title action can be taken to reset property lines, eliminating the existing easement.
  • Ask the current easement holder if they are willing to abandon use and let it naturally expire—there will need to be proof this has occurred for the easement to be removed.
  • Consult with a real estate attorney who is well-versed in both general and state-specific easement laws—there may be lesser-known “outs” for easements according to local laws.
  • If you do successfully terminate an easement, be sure it’s recorded in public records.

    While technically an easement doesn’t devalue your property, it can affect its marketability. This is always something to consider when determining to willfully grant an easement or buy a home that has an easement attached to its property deed.


    The home selling journey may include many ups and downs, particularly for a seller who fails to plan ahead. Fortunately, we're here to help you set realistic expectations for the home selling journey so you can achieve the optimal results.

    Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you establish realistic expectations for the home selling journey.

    1. Know Your Home

    Your home's condition may have deteriorated over time. Therefore, the value of your house today is unlikely to match what you initially paid for your home.

    To understand the current valuation of your house, you may want to perform a home appraisal. This will enable you to receive a property valuation from an expert home appraiser. Then, you can use this valuation to establish a competitive price for your residence.

    2. Conduct a Home Inspection

    Although you may have performed a wide range of home upgrades over the years, underlying house problems may persist. Thankfully, a home inspection makes it easy to learn about myriad home problems before you add your house to the real estate market.

    During a home inspection, a property expert will examine your residence both inside and out. Following the inspection, you'll receive an inspection report with detailed findings about the condition of your house.

    Examine the results on a home inspection report closely – you'll be glad you did. If you analyze the inspection results, you may be able to discover innovative ways to enhance your residence. And if you perform property improvements, you may be able to boost your house's value and increase the likelihood of a fast, profitable home sale.

    3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

    If you're unsure about how to kick off the home selling journey, there is no need to stress. In fact, real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide who are happy to provide comprehensive insights into all aspects of selling a house.

    A real estate agent can teach you about the ins and outs of the housing market. By doing so, a real estate agent will help you understand how to price your home and promote it to the right groups of buyers.

    Moreover, a real estate agent will deliver in-depth support at each stage of the home selling journey. He or she will set up home showings and open house events, negotiate with a buyer's agent on your behalf and help you review offers on your house. And if you ever have concerns or questions about selling your home, a real estate agent is available to respond to them right away.

    Working with a real estate agent can help you transform an ordinary home selling experience into an exceptional one. Perhaps most important, a real estate agent can offer honest, unbiased recommendations to ensure you can maintain realistic expectations throughout the home selling journey. And as such, a real estate agent can help you quickly and effortlessly accomplish your desired home selling results.


    Let's face it – selling a home in a buyer's market is far from ideal. In this scenario, a home seller likely will compete with many property sellers to promote his or her residence. And despite a home seller's best efforts, there are no guarantees that he or she will be able to maximize the value of a residence.

    A buyer's market often is a dream come true for property buyers and a worst nightmare for property sellers. Lucky for you, we're here to help you navigate a buyer's market and ensure you can get the best price for your home.

    Now, let's take a look at three tips that every home seller who is operating in a buyer's market needs to know.

    1. Complete a Home Appraisal

    A home appraisal offers a valuable opportunity for a home seller because it enables this individual to identify a property's strengths and weaknesses. That way, a home seller can find the best ways to enhance a residence and help it stand out from other available properties.

    Typically, a home appraiser will inspect a residence both inside and out. After the evaluation is completed, the home appraiser will provide a home seller with a report that describes problem areas that were identified during the assessment.

    A home appraisal report can make a world of difference for a home seller, particularly in a buyer's market. With this report in hand, a home seller can work toward enhancing a house's interior and exterior.

    2. Establish a Competitive Price for Your Residence

    What you paid for your home a few years is unlikely to match the value of your house today. Meanwhile, a home seller should set a competitive price for a residence to ensure that his or her house stirs up plenty of interest from homebuyers.

    To determine a competitive price, examine the prices of comparable homes that are currently available in your area. This will help you establish a price range for houses similar to your own.

    Furthermore, check out the prices of recently sold homes in your city or town. This housing market data can help you make an informed decision about how to price your residence.

    3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent

    An experienced real estate agent is unafraid to list a home in a buyer's market. In fact, this housing market professional knows exactly what it takes to sell a residence in any real estate market, at any time.

    Thanks to an experienced real estate agent, you can streamline the home selling process. This real estate professional will showcase your house to the right groups of property buyers consistently. He or she also will set up home showings and open houses, negotiate with property buyers on your behalf and do everything possible to help you optimize the value of your residence.

    Take the guesswork out of selling a home in a buyer's market. Use these tips, and you can keep things simple as you sell your residence.


    An offer to purchase represents a key milestone in the homebuying journey. Ultimately, it helps to plan ahead to ensure you're ready to submit a homebuying proposal. Because if you know what it takes to put together a competitive offer to purchase a house, you can boost the likelihood that a home seller accepts your proposal.

    Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you get ready to submit an offer to purchase.

    1. Study the Housing Market

    The housing market fluctuates frequently. As such, you may enter a real estate market that favors buyers but slowly shifts into sellers' favor, or vice-versa. But if you examine the real estate sector closely, you can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's one and submit an offer to purchase that accounts for the current housing market's conditions.

    If homes are selling quickly at or above their initial asking prices, you may be working in a seller's market. Comparatively, if houses linger on the real estate market for many weeks or months before they sell, you may be operating in a buyer's market. As you start to craft an offer to purchase a house, you should analyze the real estate market. By doing so, you can submit an offer to purchase that matches a seller's expectations.

    2. Get Your Finances in Order

    Entering the housing market with a budget in hand usually is beneficial. If you get pre-approved for a mortgage, you can narrow your house search and stick to a budget as you pursue your dream residence.

    Banks and credit unions can teach you everything you need to know about fixed- and adjustable-rate mortgages. Perhaps best of all, lenders employ mortgage specialists who can respond to your mortgage concerns and questions. If you collaborate with a lender today, you can get the financing you need to buy a house. Also, you can conduct a search for homes that fall within your price range and reduce the risk of submitting an offer to purchase that surpasses your budget.

    3. Avoid a "Lowball" Offer

    Submitting a "lowball" offer to purchase a home may seem like a good idea at first. Yet submitting a homebuying proposal that falls short of a seller's expectations is unlikely to help you acquire your dream house.

    In most instances, a seller will instantly reject a lowball offer to purchase. And if you receive an immediate "No" from a seller, you risk missing out on the opportunity to purchase your ideal residence.

    Allocate time and resources to craft a competitive homebuying proposal – you'll be glad you did. Otherwise, you run the risk of putting together a lowball offer that will miss the mark with a seller and force you to look elsewhere to purchase a house.

    Lastly, if you need extra assistance as you perform a house search, you may want to hire a real estate agent. By employing a real estate agent, you should have no trouble crafting a competitive offer to purchase any home, regardless of the housing market's conditions.


    With rent prices soaring in many areas of the U.S., renters are starting to consider whether now is the right time to start saving for a down payment on a home.

    Depending on where you live and what your timeline is for buying a house, you might be wondering the same thing.

    So, in today’s post, we’re going to talk about how to break down your rental costs to determine whether it makes more sense to buy a home rather than continue renting.

    Add up your rental costs

    There are any number of costs associated with renting depending on your lease agreement. Some renters are required to pay their own heating and utilities, while others have several bonuses thrown into the cost of their rent, such as internet, gym memberships and more.

    So, take a minute to write down each of your rental expenses. To get you started, here’s a list of some of the most common costs for renters:

    • Monthly rent

    • Electric bills

    • Heating bills

    • Trash removal

    • Renter’s insurance

    • Parking fees

    Now that you know how much you put toward renting each month, it’s time to take a look at what it could cost you to own a home.

    Homeowner expenses

    The key thing to remember about buying a home is that your costs can vary widely based on the size of your home, where it’s located, and a number of other factors. However, you can often find area averages online.

    If you’re considering a starter home (which you should!), then you’ll want to look at houses in your area that are on the lower end of the market.

    To get an idea of what your mortgage payments and monthly interest will be, you can use a free tool like Bankrate.

    Now, let’s make a list of your homeowner expenses:

    • Mortgage payment

    • Home insurance

    • Trash removal

    • Utilities

    • Heating and AC costs (plan for higher costs than renting due to more space)

    • Electricity

    • Property taxes (divided by 12)

    • Mortgage insurance (if you don’t have a 20% down payment saved)

    Cost-benefit analysis of owning a home vs renting

    Now that you know the general costs, you’re getting close to knowing whether it would be cheaper or more expensive to buy a home than rent.

    However, that isn’t the full picture. When you own a home, you’re responsible for maintenance and upkeep. That means you should budget around $250 per month toward maintenance. Even if you don’t use that amount each month, there’s a good chance you’ll have to make a repair or upgrade, or even hire a professional to come and fix something on your home.

    The final piece of the picture involves home equity. When you own a home, most of the money you pay each month to your lender will come back to you in the form of equity. As a renter, your money goes to your landlord and will never be seen or heard from again.

    So, if you’ve added up your lists, accounted for maintenance costs, and still have enough left over to live comfortably each month by buying a home, you can most likely bet on buying as being a better option.

    If not, it might pay off to rent for another year or two while you save up for a down payment so you can get the lowest interest rate and avoid PMI.




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